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Compare contrast essay rubric ap world

Ap World History Essay Rubric Dbq Clasifiedad Com

Be sure to explain (analyze) WHY these changes took place; remember that the pivot is usually the determining factor of change.
Explain what conditions, characteristics or patterns remained the same from the beginning of the period to the end and (analyze) WHY the stability remained.
Brainstorm change(s) that occurred during the time period as related to the topic(s) in the prompt.
Brainstorm things that remained consistent during the ENTIRE period as related to the topic(s) in the prompt.
Establish the MAJOR characteristics, patterns or conditions at the beginning of the time period.
PIVOT
List the major occurrence(s) in the prompt's timeframe that caused changes to happen, this will often become the analysis for the essay.
Analyze WHY the change(s) happened
Analyze
WHY the consistency remained
POLITICAL:
Includes state systems: having to do with political organization of a government in a society.

Compare and contrast essay ap world history summer

writing dbq essays ap essay examples

Always circle or underline the specific society (or societies) being asked about, the time period, and the key concepts (like economic or cultural problems) that are mentioned in the prompt.
Part A cont'd....
Step 3:
Determine your opinion or perspective on the prompt.
Step 4:
Group the documents in three (3) ways to answer the question......
Step 5:
Formulate a tentative thesis before you look at the documents.
Writing the Essay!!!
**You will have 45 minutes to write the essay....
Write 2 sentences of historical background about the time period you are writing about.
Write your thesis statement.

Quiz Worksheet AP World History Exam s DBQ Study com Home FC Screen Shot at PM png

Benschine
AP World History
11 October 2011

Aztec verses Inca

Two of the earliest civilizations of America were the Aztecs and the Incas.

The Best AP World History Books for Practice and Review


change over time essay ap world history china length ccot essay

As in Laos, the U.S. began to secretly bomb Cambodia in 1965 to order to impede the flow of arms to the NLF-NVA in South Vietnam. In March 1969, President Nixon significantly increased the aerial assaults under the codename MENU, while still keeping the raids secret from the American people, an amazing feat considering that 110,000 tons of bombs were dropped over a fourteen-month period. A Pentagon report, released in 1973, stated that Nixon’s national security adviser, “Henry A. Kissinger approved each of the 3,875 Cambodia bombing raids in 1969 and 1970 as well as the methods for keeping them out of the newspapers.” In March 1970, Cambodia fell into civil war after Defense Minister Lon Nol engineered a coup d’état. The U.S. backed the anticommunist Nol, sending U.S. forces into Cambodia in May and June. U.S. bombing continued until Congress passed legislation forcing the administration to end it in August 1973. All told, the U.S. dropped 2.7 million tons of bombs on Cambodia, an amount that exceeded the tonnage dropped on Laos. According to the diplomatic historian Greg Grandin:

Mr. Hoge and Dr. Ruther's AP World History Class

While U.S. policymakers agonized over the decision to bomb the North out of fear of drawing in the Soviets or Chinese, there was no such constraint on bombing the South. The United States dropped almost twice the tonnage of bombs on its ally, South Vietnam, an area two-thirds the size of Great Britain, as it did on all countries in World War II. According to the historian and former U.S. Air Force pilot, James P. Harrison, “Most of the bombs (about 4 million tons) and virtually all of the defoliants were dropped on our ally … In South Vietnam over half of the forests and 9,000 or 15,000 hamlets were heavily damaged.

Building an Argument Tower – AP World History Teacher

National Security adviser McGeorge Bundy claimed in Foreign Affairs (January 1967) that the bombing of the North was “the most accurate and restrained in modern warfare.” Eyewitnesses, however, pointed to the bombing of hospitals, schools, Buddhist pagodas, agricultural cooperatives, administrative buildings, fishing boats, dikes, and a leper colony and sanitarium, resulting in the death of an estimated 52,000 to 180,000 civilians. Nam Dinh, Vietnam’s third largest city in North Vietnam, was “made to resemble the city of a vanished civilization,” according to New York Times reporter Harrison Salisbury, despite being a center for silk and textile production, not war-related production. In Vinh (population 72,000), the destruction was akin to the German city of Dresden in World War II. This included nearly all homes, thirty-one schools, the university, four hospitals, the main bookstore and cinema, two churches, an historic 18th century Buddhist pagoda that served as the cultural center of the city, a museum of the revolution, and the 19th century imperial citadel.