Kermode, Frank. On Eliot's life and The 27 Sept. 1984.

Is writing anexpression of self, or, as TS Eliot argued, 'an escape from personality'?

T.S. Eliot, ,(New York: Harcourt, Brace and World, 1950) pp. 251-263

Eliot, T. Articles published in Studies in Literature and Language! T S Eliot The Waste Land?
Shop for Selected Essays by T! Eliot, Selected Essays,? Lected essays. 1932). Iot, T. Selected Essays, 1917 1932 (Harcourt, 1950). Ndon: Faber and Faber Limited. Iot, T? Iot, T. KB Eliot, T. Selected Essays, ed. Liot including information and reviews. Faber and Faber, London 1976 6.
Anastasia Marou 1990 T. KB.. Ssays Selected Essays. Poetry and Drama (Faber.

At the age of 25, Eliot moved to England where he began his career as a poet.

Tradition versus theindividual talent

the dim and antiquated term wit into the equally unsatisfactorynomenclature of our own time. Even Cowley is only able to define it bynegatives:
It has passed out of our critical coinage altogether, and no new termhas been struck to replace it; the quality seldom exists, and is neverrecognized.
So far Cowley has spoken well. But if we are to attempt even no morethan Cowley, we, placed in a retrospective attitude, must risk muchmore than anxious generalizations. With our eye still on Marvell, wecan say that wit is not erudition; it is sometimes stifled byerudition, as in much of Milton. It is not cynicism, though it has akind of toughness which may be confused with cynicism by thetender-minded. It is confused with erudition because it belongs to aneducated mind, rich in generations of experience; and it is confusedwith cynicism because it implies a constant inspection and criticismof experience. It involves, probably, a recognition, implicit in theexpression of every experience, of other kinds of experience which arepossible, which we find as clearly in the greatest as in poets likeMarvell. Such a general statement may seem to take us a long way from, or even from the "Horatian Ode";but it is perhaps justified by the desire to account for that precisetaste of Marvell's which finds for him the proper degree ofseriousness for every subject which he treats. His errors of taste,when he trespasses, are not sins against this virtue; they areconceits, distended metaphors and similes, but they never consist intaking a subject too seriously or too lightly. This virtue of wit isnot a peculiar quality of minor poets, or of the minor poets of oneage or of one school; it is an intellectual quality which perhaps onlybecomes noticeable by itself, in the work of lesserpoets. Furthermore, it is absent from the work of Wordsworth, Shelley,and Keats, on whose poetry nineteenth-century criticism hasunconsciously been based. To the best of their poetry wit isirrelevant:
We should find it difficult to draw any useful comparison betweenthese lines of Shelley and anything by Marvell. But later poets, whowould have been the better for Marvell's quality, were without it;even Browning seems oddly immature, in some way, beside Marvell. Andnowadays we find occasionally good irony, or satire, which lack wit'sinternal equilibrium, because their voices are essentially protestsagainst some outside sentimentality or stupidity; or we find seriouspoets who seem afraid of acquiring wit, lest they lose intensity. Thequality which Marvell had, this modest and certainly impersonalvirtue--whether we call it wit or reason, or even urbanity--we havepatently failed to define. By whatever name we call it, and however wedefine that name, it is something precious and needed and apparentlyextinct; it is what should preserve the reputation of Marvell.

Alfred Prufrock, was known as one of the most famous pieces of the Modernist movement.

Eliot advocated that education was not simply for the sake of bettering oneself but he realized that education and economic development went hand in hand....

In his poetry, Eliot combines themes such as aridity, sexuality, and living death....


T.S. Eliot - Modernism Lab Essays

Eliot’s “The Waste Land” that both critics and lay readers have repeatedly felt forced to look outside the published text of the poem for clues as to its meaning.

Eliot (1888-1965) is synonymous with modernism

celebration proposed by that favoured borough, but a little seriousreflection upon his writing. That is an act of piety, which is verydifferent from the resurrection of a deceased reputation. Marvell hasstood high for some years; his best poems are not very many, and notonly must be well known, from the and the, but must also have beenenjoyed by numerous readers. His grave needs neither rose nor rue norlaurel; there is no imaginary justice to be done; we may think abouthim, if there be need for thinking, for our own benefit, not his. Tobring the poet back to life--the great, the perennial, task ofcriticism--is in this case to squeeze the drops of the essence of twoor three poems; even confining ourselves to these, we may find someprecious liquor unknown to the present age. Not to determine rank, butto isolate this quality, is the critical labour. The fact that of allMarvell's verse, which is itself not a great quantity, the reallyvaluable part consists of a very few poems indicates that the unknownquality of which we speak is probably a literary rather than apersonal quality; or, more truly, that it is a quality of acivilization, of a traditional habit of life. A poet like Donne, orlike Baudelaire or Laforgue, may almost be considered the inventor ofan attitude, a system of feeling or of morals. Donne is difficult toanalyse: what appears at one time a curious personal point of view mayat another time appear rather the precise concentration of a kind offeeling diffused in the air about him. Donne and his shroud, theshroud and his motive for wearing it, are inseparable, butThe seventeenth century sometimes seems for more than a moment togather up and to digest into its art all the experience of the humanmind which (from the same point of view) the later centuries seem tohave been partly engaged in repudiating. But Donne would have been anindividual at any time and place; Marvell's best verse is the productof European, that is to say Latin, culture.

06/09/2017 · Tradition and the Individual Talent

Eliot's The Waste Land “Both the hysteric and the mystic transgress the linear syntax and logic governing the established symbolic order.” -Helen Bennett It is perhaps part of the unique genius of T.S.