The other voice : essays on modern poetry / | Western …

The other voice : essays on modern poetry / | Western State..

The Other Voice: Essays on Modern Poetry ..

I teach at Fairington Elementary School, a Title I school, located in southeast DeKalb County in Georgia. The school's student population is predominantly African American. Some of the students come to school with life experiences similar to Langston Hughes's. The separation of their parents, moving around from one place to another, absence of a mother or father, and hardships has an emotional impact on their lives. I desire for my students to use their voices to express their feelings about the world around them as Langston Hughes did. I want their voices to grab the reader's attention as they write poems about their life experiences.

The Other Voice: Essays on Modern Poetry: …

The Other Voice: Essays on Modern Poetry.: Octavio. …

AERLINN(Sindarin, aer+ lin, "ocean-song," sometimes spelled aerlin): As part of his , Tolkien sought to fill out his imaginary words with complete histories, mythologies, and poetic traditions. Accordingly, he invented the aerlinn, an imaginary genre of Elvish poetry that Tolkien devised to be background for The Lord of the Rings. Aerlinns are with a seven-line stanza-structure rhyming aababcc. The form may be loosely inspired by the seven-line stanza invented by Chaucer in the fourteenth century that later came into its own as . The aerlinn's conventional theme would be a or an , usually to Elbereth or another of the . Tolkien's etymology for the word aerlinn connects the idea of holiness with the ocean. In his , the potentially immortal Elves eventually suffer a sea-longing. They feel a compulsion that calls them to sail over the western sea to join the Valar and leave behind the world of men. Below is a sample aerlinn in Elvish from the end of chapter one, "Merry Meetings," in The Two Towers:

The Other Voice: Essays on Modern Poetry

The general fragmentation of "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" is obviousand notorious. The poem seems a perfect example of what Terry Eagleton calls the modern"transition from metaphor to metonymy: unable any longer to totalize his experiencein some heroic figure, the bourgeois is forced to let it trickle away into objects relatedto him by sheer contiguity." Everything in "Prufrock" trickles away intoparts related to one another only by contiguity. Spatial progress in the poem is diffidentor deferred, a "scuttling" accomplished by a pair of claws disembodied soviolently they remain "ragged." In the famous opening, "the evening isspread out against the sky / Like a patient etherised upon a table," and the similemakes an equation between being spread out and being etherised that continues elsewhere inthe poem when the evening, now a bad patient, "malingers, / Stretched on the floor,here beside you and me." There it "sleeps so peacefully! / Smoothed by longfingers . . . ." This suspension is a rhetorical as well as a spatial and emotionalcondition. The "streets that follow like a tedious argument / Of insidiousintent" lead not to a conclusion but to a question, a question too"overwhelming" even to ask. Phrases like the "muttering retreats / Ofrestless nights" combine physical blockage, emotional unrest, and rhetoricalmaundering in an equation that seems to make the human being a combination not of angeland beast but of road-map and Roberts' Rules of Order.

The other voice essays on modern poetry


The other voice : essays on modern poetry (Book, …

I would use Langston Hughes' poem, "Dreams" to teach the public voice and metaphors. I want students to dream and have ways to articulate their dreams. In this poem, Hughes is speaking to the people who believe in dreams. He is telling them to hold on to their dreams. Hughes writes that without dreams, life is meaningless and hopeless.

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By completing a series of engaging activities, the students will accomplish the objectives for this unit. They will read a familiar poem with expression by reading aloud with a partner or in a group. The students can enjoy reading a poem that they practiced or wrote during Writer's Workshop. The students will use oral language for different purposes by reading and reciting poems to an audience. They will identify the meaning of poetic devices and incorporate them in oral and written language. This objective can be accomplished when the students write the definition of poetic devices in their journals and highlight examples of poetic devices in other poems. The students will also incorporate poetic devices in their poems written during Writer's Workshop. The students should make judgments and inferences about characters and events. This objective can be accomplished by answering reflection questions and supporting answers with evidence from the poems. The students will summarize the content of a poem by responding to discussion questions and participating in class discussions. The students can identify the basic elements of poetry by analyzing an array of poems by Langston Hughes and engaging in text rendering.

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In this poem the horror of sex seems to come in part from its power to metonymize. LikeAugustine, Eliot sees sex as the tyranny of one part of the body over the whole. ThoughEliot is far too circumspect to name this part, he figures its power in his poetry by therebelliousness of mere members: hands, arms, eyes. Sexual desire pulls the body apart, sothat to give in to it is to suffer permanent dismemberment. This may account for the oddcombination in Eliot's work of sexual ennui and libidinous violence. The tyranny of onepart scatters all the others, reducing the whole to impotence. In this way, the violenceof sex robs the individual of the integrity necessary to action.