We love football because the game of ..

All the irrelevant and unnecessary information can be ignored while writing the body of the essay.

Sample Essay, My Love of Soccer - Course Hero

Soccer, on the other hand, except for its half-time break, has no time-outs; except for half-time, it is constant run, run, run, run, back and forth, back and forth, relentlessly, with only a few seconds of relaxation when a goal is scored, and that can happen seldom, sometimes never. The best that commercial television coverage can hope for is an injury time-out, and in soccer that happens only with decapitation or disembowelment.

Free Essays on i Love Soccer through - Essay Depot

Second, Americans love their violence, and soccer doesn't deliver on this score the way that American football and hockey do. There are brief moments, spurts of violence, yes, but fans can't expect the full-time menu of bone-crushing carnage that American football and hockey can deliver minute after minute, game after game. In soccer, players are actually singled out and warned — shamed, with embarrassingly silly "yellow cards," for acts of violence and duplicity that would be smiled at in most American sports other than tennis and golf.

Third, it is just too difficult to score in soccer. America loves its football games with scores like 49 to 35 and a professional basketball game with scores below 100 is regarded as a defensive bore. In soccer, on the other hand, scores like 2 to 1, even 1 to 0, are commonplace and apparently desirable; games scoreless at the end of regulation time happen all the time. (In the 515 games played in the final phase in the history of the World Cup games through 1994, only 1584 goals have been scored. That's three a game!) And if there is no resolution at the end of overtime, the teams resort to a shoot-out that has more to do with luck than with real soccer skills. Worse yet, it is possible for a team to dominate in terms of sheer talent and "shots-on-goal" and still lose the game by virtue of a momentary lapse in defensive attention, a stroke of bad luck, and the opponent's break-away goal. Things like that can happen, too, in baseball, but the problem somehow evens out over baseball's very long season of daily games. In soccer, it just isn't fair. Soccer authorities should consider making the goal smaller and doing away with the goalie to make scoring easier. And the business of starting over after each goal, in the middle of the field, has to be reconsidered. It's too much like the center-jump after each goal in the basketball game of yesteryear.


My Love Of Soccer « Mercedes | This I Believe

You will have to determine which causes or effects you're going to write about. For instance, if there are too many causes for you to deal with in the scope of your essay, you'll have to decide what are the main causes, the ones you have to treat, and then suggest to your reader that there are other, relatively minor, causes outside the scope of your essay. Even in an essay as extensive as Kutter's, there are surely things he could have said but chose not to. In an essay on the effects of El Niño, the price you pay for orange juice might not belong in an essay alongside the devastating effects of tornadoes and ice-storms and mudslides and people's fear of uncontrollable weather patterns.

I love soccer and nothing can take me away from it

I love soccer because it is fun, it’s a competitive sport, and also because it takes my mind off of things. I hope this inspired you to play soccer or even just watch it on TV because it’s a great sport! But there are other sports that you may like even more. As for me, I believe in soccer.

I like soccer because I have been playing since I was in preschool

The purpose of this essay is to inform you about the things Pelé accomplished throughout his life and career, and also about what he did that effected the world so much.

Free Essays on Why I Play Soccer

Being a soccer referee is one of the most valuable job experiences I’ve ever had, even if it’s one of the hardest. The reason might be surprising – refereeing is terrifying. The first time I stepped out on the field, I was 14 and I wanted to run away: far, far away from the players and especially the adults. The parents, many of whom are cultured professionals practicing law and medicine, are anything but when they line the sideline. They do not see a kid who happens to be a referee. They see an enemy whose decisions directly affect what they desperately want. Normal rules of culture and society do not apply. More than once, I’ve awakened one Saturday morning, dreading getting up and going. Never mind learning about the mechanics of a sport I love, or having a job that demands fitness and intellect for very little pay. When refereeing, I am under strict scrutiny by over-protective parents, competitive players and coaches, and die-hard fans; I am the object of insult, the center of riots, the scapegoat and whipping boy.