Analysis - Dulce Et Decorum Est - Wilfred Owen will be available on

Wilfred Owen saw the war first-hand and this poem is about a gas attack that he witnessed.

Sample questions on the poetry of Wilfred Owen.

It would be a mistake to label Owen as merely an "angry poet", but there is no doubt that many of his poems are dripping with scorn and anger, albeit couched in beautiful turns of phrase and admirable rhythm and sound. First, Owen is angry with the rulers of Europe and the military leaders for beginning, promulgating, and continuing past reason the First World War. He is angry that they waste young men, feeding them with specious patriotism and lies and caring not a whit for their loss of innocence and loss of life. He is angry that young men can so easily lie about their ages and enlist. Secondly, he is frustrated by the women back at home. They prefer to live in ignorance and placidity, not wanting to confront the ghosts of those who die in order to maintain their comfort and obliviousness. He is also deeply critical of poets and politicians who proclaim that the war is glorious; for him, "Dulce et Decorum est" is "the old Lie". He is angry at other poets - Robert Graves, Jessie Pope - who do not want him to dwell on piteous things. He is angry at the Church for promoting the war. Owen's anger makes his poems vibrant and incisive.

What do "Disabled" and "Dulce et Decorum est" suggest about why young men went to war?

Essays and criticism on Wilfred Owen - Critical Essays.

The poem, “Dulce et Decorum Est,” is Latin for “It is sweet and right,” a phrase that was used extensively during the initial days of the First World War.

What is the tension between message and form in "Dulce et Decorum est"?

Owen believes that young men went to war for reasons that were understandable, but it was unlikely that they would be able to deal with the atrocities they would witness and commit. In "Disabled" the boy goes to war for reasons that are seemingly superficial but also achingly resonant. He was a football hero and looked for similar success on the battlefield. He also dreamed of impressing a girl. His thoughts were on the glory and the camaraderie, not the "fears / Of fear". In "Dulce et Decorum est" the young men presumably join the war because their heads are filled with "the old Lie" that it is an honor to die for one's country. At school and church boys were told that it was their civic duty to fight and that they would gain honor and glory. Owen is understanding about the soldier in "Disabled", but he is certainly derisive and angry about the lies perpetuated by the authority figures alluded to in "Dulce".

However, Wilfred Owen's poem "Dulce et Decorum Est" shows the ugly, horrible side of fighting....


Study Guide for the Wilfred Owen Poem.

How To Study For Wilfred owen - SlideShare Sep 17, 2013 ... Understanding An Essay Question 'Owen's poems reveal tenderness and compassion towards those whose lives have Planning A Response ...

Questions for Reflection: “Dulce et Decorum Est” by Wilfred Owen ...

“Dulce et Decorum Est” uses descriptive words to create realistic images of the horrors soldiers are faced with during combat, whereas “next to of course god america i” uses sarcasm to inform readers that the abuse of propaganda can be used to manipulate others....

Wilfred Owen Poetry analysis Essay Example | Topics, Sample ...

Wilfred Owen Poetry: AS English Literature, Westlake Boys CiE Nov 2, 2014 ... Overview/reminder of the big picture for Wilfred Owen Poetry: AS ...

Questions on the poem 'Disabled' by Wilfred Owen by Tiger Bear ...

- The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est WILFRED OWEN Wilfred Owen served in World War One, and started as a cheerful and optimistic man, ready to die gloriously for his country.

Soon after he was enlisted, he was diagnosed with shell-shock and put in hospital where he met Siegfried Sassoon.

His attitude changed as he fought more and more in the war.

Mar 11, 2013 ... Questions on the poem 'Disabled' by Wilfred Owen ...

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"Dulce et Decorum Est" contrasts intensely with the poems mentioned.

Thanks to the poem “Dulce et Decorum Est,” Wilfred Owen gives the reader a small window into the horrors that he witnessed firsthand in the carnage of battle.