One of his arguments is just by definition miracles are unbelievable.

Don’t worry; you’re not the first person that does not believe in miracles.

And have no rational means in believing miracles.

The great empiricist philosopher David Hume was one of the first to present an analysis of miracles that tried to explain why they are created (by human beings themselves, in Hume’s opinion) and why people are so ready to believe in them.

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So do accounts of miracles support the belief in God.

This does not mean that the witness of 1 Corinthians 13 is equivalent to the witness of the Maroon Bells near Aspen, Colorado. The Bible speaks to us in language, teaching us directly. God's Creation inspires awe in us at the works of the Creator who made it all and sustains it in the present time. The Bible is the greater witness. Creation does not contradict it.

In my opinion a miracle is something that happens that seems beyond belief.

If you don't believe me, look these things up for yourself. You should, anyway, whether you believe me or not! Go to the library and look up the references that a young-earth creationist cites. Examine the original context, and judge for yourself whether important information is omitted, and if the creationist has quoted the source fairly, accurately, and completely. Judge whether the original meaning has changed. Do some searches on the Internet. You can begin with the references that I have included with this essay. On the Internet you will have to learn to discern the truth among a large number of competing claims. That's an important responsibility. Take the time to discern well. Remember that the number of repetitions and verbal volume don't make truth. Get started now.

On one side of the debate is that of why miracles lead us to believe in God.


Miracle Essay - 619 Words - StudyMode

These claims have a major impact on his argument against the existence of miracles, and in this essay I will explain and critically evaluate this argument.

Newman Reader - Essays on Miracles

From a religious perspective, a miracle is a word used to describe a phenomenal event for the good of a person, which is believed to have a divine cause, i.e., it is linked to God's action.

Essays on Miracles John Henry Newman

Once government has had a monopoly of a creative activity such, for instance, as the delivery of the mails, most individuals will believe that the mails could not be efficiently delivered by men acting freely. And here is the reason: Each one acknowledges that he himself doesn't know how to do all the things incident to mail delivery. He also recognizes that no other individual could do it. These assumptions are correct. No individual possesses enough know-how to perform a nation's mail delivery any more than any individual possesses enough know-how to make a pencil. Now, in the absence of faith in free people—in the unawareness that millions of tiny know-hows would naturally and miraculously form and cooperate to satisfy this necessity—the individual cannot help but reach the erroneous conclusion that mail can be delivered only by governmental "master-minding."

Newman Reader - Essays on Miracles - I-1

However, one of the things about miracles is that they need interpreting; and rationally, if we look, for example, at John’s gospel where he calls the miracles he includes ‘signs’ and then read the verse where the author clearly writes: ‘These things are written that you may believe’ we have got to be sceptical about their absolute veracity.

Freedom Accelerators – Miracle of life essays

Many words, phrases, and stories in the Bible are obviously non-literal. Some cases are not so obvious. But it is a mistake to insist that certain portions of Genesis must be taken literally because it supports someone's viewpoint. It incorrectly projects our Western data-centric mindset onto the Hebrew way of thinking. There are fundamentalist Christians who insist that the Apostle Paul's "thorn in the flesh" (2 Corinthians 12:7) must be interpreted non-literally (they contend that this passage refers to a person who was harrassing Paul, not a physical ailment). The Bible uses non-literal metaphors and illustrations to reveal the ways of God because our language and experience cannot fully express His divine nature.