The Rebellion of Satan in Milton’s Paradise Lost | …

John Milton published the first edition of Paradise Lost in 1667

Paradise Lost (John MILTON, 1608 – 1674 ..

Though Pythagoras is credited with first using this term to describe the Universe, probably since he is also the one most commonly cited for ideas of harmony and the Musica Mundana, cosmos is generally a contrast to "chaos"-"the first state of the universe." In explaining the theology and cosmology of Paradise Lost, Milton writes, "the heavens and earth/ Rose out of Chaos," describing the move from the formless mass to the ordered whole....

Milton, in Paradise Lost, establishes that with sex, as with religion, he is of no particular hierarchical establishment....

“Paradise Lost” by John Milton Essay Sample

The hero is not the only epic tradition to be reconfigured in ; the poem also plays on readers' expectations about epic form. Although it most resembles an epic, contains elements of many other genres: there are elements of lyric poetry, including the pastoral mode, as in the descriptions of Paradise, the conversations between the unfallen Adam and Eve, and their joyful prayers to God in the Garden (). There is an aubade (), a type of symposium (Raphael's visit, 5-8), and examples of georgic verse (, , ). There are also elements of tragedy, as in Book 9 when Milton, preparing his readers for the fall, writes, "I now must change / Those Notes to Tragic," and continues throughout the book to employ tragic conventions, as when he apostrophizes Eve () and describes the earth's response to the eating of the fruit ( and ). Throughout the poem Milton makes use of soliloquy, another tragic convention. And even the ten-book structure of the 1667 edition, according to John Leonard, "might owe something to English tragedy, forming five dramatic acts of two books each" ( xi). In fact, Milton's first attempts to write the story of man's fall took the form of a tragedy that he later rejected in favor of epic. Scott Elledge writes that Milton favored tragedy because of its "affective and curative powers," which are no less present in than in his more formal tragedy, (xxvi). As Barbara Lewalski writes, the incorporation of multiple genres into the poem invites us "to identify certain patterns and certain poems as subtexts for portions of Milton's poem, and then to attend to the completion or transformation of those allusive patterns as the poem proceeds" (20).

In two primary works of seventeenth century British literature, Paradise Lost and The Blazing World, John Milton and Margaret Cavendish both employ the device of the alien leader, but they employ these devices in different ways; which belie their tho...