"Fletcher, Faithful Shepherdess IV iv: [...]" R. Lonsdale, 1969.

In essence, a person’s perception of crime is based on their upbringing and background.

"Fletcher, Faithful Shepherdess IV iv: [...]" R. Lonsdale, 1969.

" ''Jam jam non domus accipiet te laeta, neque uxor
optima, nec dulces occurrent oscula nati
praeripere et tacita pectus dulcedine tangent.''
Lucretius, III. 894-896.
''Now no more shall thy house admit thee with glad welcome, nor a most virtuous wife and sweet children run to be the first to snatch kisses and touch thy heart with a silent joy.'' (Munro.)
Though Lucretius is only mentioning these common regrets of mankind in order to show their unreasonableness, there is no doubt that Gray had this passage well in his mind here. Feeling this, Munro renders it in quite Lucretian phraseology: e.g.
''Jam jam non erit his rutilans focus igne:
and
non reditum balbe current patris hiscere nati.''
But Gray adds also an Horatian touch, as Mitford points out:
''Quodsi pudica mulier in partem juvet
domum atque dulces liberos
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
sacrum vetustis excitet lignis focum
lassi sub adventum viri,'' &c. Hor. Epode, II. 39 sq.
[''But if a chaste and pleasing wife
To ease the business of his life
Divides with him his household care
. . . . . . . . . . . .
Will fire for winter nights provide,
And without noise will oversee
His children and his family
And order all things till he come
Weary and over-laboured home'' &c. Dryden.]
Thomson in his Winter, 1726, had written of the shepherd overwhelmed in the snow-storm:
''In vain for him the officious wife prepares
The fire fair-blazing, and the vestment warm;
In vain his little children, peeping out
Into the mingling rack, demand their sire
With tears of artless innocence.'' (ll. 311-315.)"

“Persephone's Quest: Entheogens and the Origins of Religion.” Yale University Press, 1986.

"had damp'd Eton, with depress'd repress'd written above."

"Lucretius iii 894-6: iam iam non domus accipiet te laeta, neque uxor / optima nec dulces occurrent oscula nati / praeripere et tacita pectus dulcedine tangent (No longer now will your happy home give you welcome, no longer will your best of wives and sweet children race to win the first kisses, and thrill your heart to its depths with sweetness). Cp. Dryden's translation, Latter Part of the 3rd Book of Lucretius 76-9: 'But to be snatch'd from all thy household joys, / From thy Chast Wife, and thy dear prattling boys, / Whose little arms about thy Legs are cast, / And climbing for a Kiss prevent their Mothers hast'; and Thomson's imitation, Winter 311-6: 'In vain for him the officious wife prepares / The fire fair-blazing and the vestment warm; / In vain his little children, peeping out / Into the mingling storm, demand their sire / With tears of artless innocence. Alas! / Nor wife nor children more shall he behold.' Cp. also Horace, Epodes ii 39-40, 43-4: quod si pudica mulier in partem iuvet / domum atque dulces liberos ... / sacrum vestutis extruat lignis focum / lassi sub adventum viri (But if a modest wife shall do her part in tending home and children dear ... piling the sacred hearth with seasoned firewood against the coming of her weary husband). Cp. also Dryden, Georgics ii 760-1 (translating Virgil, ii 523): 'His little Children climbing for a Kiss, / Welcome their Father's late return at Night'; Thomson adopted the first line of this couplet, Liberty iii 173; and see also J. Warton, Ode to Evening 3 (quoted in l. 3n above)."

Now we have a repress on 10inch including the instrumental remix on the B side.

"Cp. Virgil's contrast of the 'happy husbandmen' with the ambitious citizen, Georgics ii 503-10: sollicitant alii remis freta caeca, ruuntque / in ferrum, penetrant aulas et limina regum; / hic petit excidiis urbem miserosque penates, / ut gemma bibat et Sarrano dormiat ostro; / condit opes alius defossoque incubat auro; / hic stupet attonitus rostris; hunc plausus hiantem / per cuneos geminatus enim plebisque patrumque / corripuit; gaudent perfusi sanguine fratrum (Others vex with oars seas unknown, dash upon the sword, or press into courts and the portals of kings. One wreaks ruin on a city and its hapless homes, that he may drink from a jewelled cup and sleep on Tyrian purple; another hoards up wealth and broods over buried gold; one is dazed and astounded by the Rostra; another, open-mouthed, is carried away by the plaudits of princes and of people, rolling again and again on the benches. Gleefully they steep themselves in their brothers' blood)."

"weary way, ploughman plods. These alliterations heighten the sorrowfulness of the atmosphere"