The gods decide Oedipus and Jocasta’s fate even before they know it.

Sophocles often used a characters’ flaw to alter or influence the outcome or future of the hero.

This is where Oedipus was adopted as the son of the King and Queen.

It is the purpose of this essay to demonstrate the types of characters present in Sophocles’ tragic drama, Oedipus Rex, whether static or dynamic, whether flat or round, and whether protrayed through showing or telling.

The question is: Did Oedipus deserve his punishments.

He asks Creon to expel him from Thebes as quickly as he can and gives orders for Jocasta’s burial (1446ff), a gesture of concern and responsibility characteristic of the Oedipus we saw in the opening scenes(73)....

Firstly, I will look at the role of the chorus objectively, examining the basic role of the chorus in the play, and looking at the role of the Chorus as Sophocles would have intended the role of the Chorus to be understood.


"Oedipus the King" was introduced around 429 B.C.E.

This essay will explore the role of women in the drama, the attitude toward women therein, the involvement of women in plot development, and other aspects of women in Oedipus Rex....

This was Sophocles' most celebrated play.

This is achieved by using dramatic irony, the prophecy that guided Oedipus towards the truth regarding his childhood, and key scenes in the play, which help to build the audiences understanding and opinions concerning his situation.

Oedipus committed murder but unknowingly of who King Laius was.

Sophocles in his tragedy, Oedipus Rex, teaches about “morally desirable attitudes and behavior,” (4) and uses three women to help convey these principles of living.

Oedipus' honor was his claim against the murder.

First off early on in Oedipus’ life his first deadly mistake towards succeeding his self-inflicted downfall was the murder of his father the former king.

Oedipus was royalty and knew it as well did King Laius.

(...)Greek theater was directed at the moral and political education of the community." (Kennedy and Gioia, pgs 1357-1363) Sophocles understood this, and dissipated any pollyanic view of society by presenting us with plays that were intended to teach.

However, this does not necessarily mean that Oedipus must be pitied.

Oedipus had many faults, but it was primarily the tragic flaw of hubris, arrogance from excessive pride, which doomed his existence, regardless of the character attributes that made him such a beloved king....

Oedipus could evoke fear in us, not pity.

Oedipus, the tragic character in Sophocles’ Oedipus the King, certainly makes several such mistakes; however, the pervasive pattern of his judgemental errors seems to indicate a basic character flaw that precipitates them....