Samuel de Champlain was born in 1570 and was a French explorer.

 Samuel de Champlain, Premiers récits de voyages en Nouvelle-France, 1603—1619 (2009);

Samuel de Champlain: Founding of New France Essay | …

In 1628 Richelieu's company sent out the first of four vessels bearing cargoes of provisions, munitions and a few settlers. Champlain eagerly awaited their arrival but he waited in vain for an English force led by a Scotsman named David Kirke captured the French ships in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. No sooner had word reached Champlain of this catastrope, than Kirke appeared before Quebec and in a note signed, demanded Champlain's surrender. Champlain concealed his pressing need for supplies and in an equally courteous reply refused to yield. His bravado convinced Kirke that Quebec could best be captured by starvation so he sailed away to England leaving Champlain at Quebec to face the winter with few resources. When Kirke returned the following spring with a second summons to surrender, Champlain capitulated. Amid the beating of drums and the booming of cannons Champlain's little settlement sadly saw the English flag raised over its ramparts. With all courtesy Kirke returned most members of the captured colony to France. A distraught and careworn Champlain returned to France where he appealled to the Company and the king to re-acquire Canada. His petition restated his earlier arguments about the great value of the vast country In 1632 France and England signed a treaty that returned Quebec to France much to the joy of Champlain who had given almost life-long service to the colony. On March 23rd, 1633 Champlain left Dieppe with a fleet of three vessels conveying men needed for the fur trade along with soldiers, craftsmen, labourers and some women and children. They reached Quebec on May 23rd and that same day they took possession of the post in a solemn military ceremony. A squadron of soldiers, pikes in hand and muskets at rest on their shoulders, went before him to the roll of martial drums. A quarter of a century of tireless effort had finally borne fruit in the realization of his dream - the settlement of New Fance. Alfred, Lord Tennyson's oft-quoted last lines from find a fit focus in Champlain as he led his small band back to the little settlement he sought so hard to found and foster.Come, my friends,
'Tis not too late to seek a newer world.
Push off, and sitting well in order smite
The sounding furrows; for my purpose holds
To sail beyond the sunset and the baths
Of all the western stars until I die. Tho' much is taken, much abides; and tho'
We are not now that strength which in old days
Moved earth and heaven; that which we are, we are;
One equal temper of heroic hearts,
Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
To strive, to seek, to find and not to yield. Now an old man Champlain, wished to end his days on duty in New France as the king's lieutenant of the land he loved. As the last days of July drew to a close 150 canoes reached Quebec, paddled by five hundred Hurons and laden with the richest skins. Sixty of their leaders held a council and welcomed Champlain back with genuine emotion.. The rhetorical gifts of the red man were among his many endowments and their eloquence was lavished on a leader they loved and respected. Champlain resumed his work of restoring relations with the Hurons and Algonquins since everything was dependent on profits from the fur trade. In 1634 he built a fort to check the English seaman seeking a share of the fur trade and established a new settlement at what became where he constructed a battery of cannon. Well aware of the little settlement's inability to defend itself, Champlain appealled to Richelieu and proposed that 120 men armed with light weapons be sent to Canada. He believed that their strength combined with that of two thousand Natives would be sufficient to crush the enemy. Richelieu failed to reply to this passionate appeal which proved to be Champlain's last. Despite his best efforts the colony continued its meagre, hand-to-mouth fashion and he never did see it grow and prosper.

Champlain, Derniers récits de voyages en Nouvelle-France et autres écrits, 1620-1632 (2009);

Essay about Samuel de Champlain - 615 Words

Little reliable information exists about Samuel de Champlain's pre-Canadian career. He was a slight, spare, dark-skinned man with eyes that endlessly scanned the sea that was to become his life. Samuel was born of a seafaring family in Brouage,[*] a fortified town north of Bordeaux on the Bay of Biscay facing the Atlantic Ocean. Apparently the Champlain family had three houses there, but the one in which Samuel was born is unknown. The town's birth records were lost in a fire, so the date of his birth is unknown. Some records suggest he was born in 1567.

Its membership soon expanded to include the Maritimestribes:Maliseet, Passamaquoddy, and Micmac.

On March 23rd, 1633 Champlain left Dieppe with a fleet of three vessels conveying men needed for the fur trade along with soldiers, craftsmen, labourers and some women and children. They reached Quebec on May 23rd and that same day they took possession of the post in a solemn military ceremony. A squadron of soldiers, pikes in hand and muskets at rest on their shoulders, went before him to the roll of martial drums. A quarter of a century of tireless effort had finally borne fruit in the realization of his dream - the settlement of New Fance.

Also, during the time period of 1601-1603, Samuel de Champlain was a geographer for King Henry IV....


Samuel de Champlain Essay - 782 Words - StudyMode

In 1602 or thereabouts, Henry IV of France appointed Champlain as hydrographer royal. Aymar de Chaste, governor of Dieppe in Northern France, had obtained a monopoly of the fur trade and set up a trading post at Tadoussac. He invited Champlain to join an expedition he was sending there. Champlain’s mission was clear; it was to explore the country called New France, examine its waterways and then choose a site for a large trading factory.

FREE Samuel de Champlain Essay - Example Essays

Since the XXVIIth century, this doorway from the citadel of Brouage has led to long days of danger on the sea. Among those passing through this portal was Samuel de Champlain, whose name became famous as the founder of Canada.

Samuel De Champlain Essay - 340 Words | Majortests

In 21 voyages to New France he laid the foundations for modern Canada.Samuel de Champlain was born at Brouage, a small Huguenot seaport town in Saintonge.