The critic who judges by imagery and metaphor alone (289-304).3.

This is a librivox recording of An Essay on Criticism by Alexander.    Essay on Poetic Theory.

Essays and criticism on Horace - Horace - (Poetry Criticism)

Yet if we look more closely we shall find
Most have the seeds of judgment in their mind
Nature affords at least a glimmering light
The lines though touched but faintly are drawn right,
But as the slightest sketch if justly traced
Is by ill coloring but the more disgraced
So by false learning is good sense defaced
Some are bewildered in the maze of schools []
And some made coxcombs nature meant but fools
In search of wit these lose their common sense
And then turn critics in their own defense
Each burns alike who can or cannot write
Or with a rival's or an eunuch's spite
All fools have still an itching to deride
And fain would be upon the laughing side
If Maevius scribble in Apollo's spite []
There are who judge still worse than he can write.

Mell, Jr., "Alexander Pope (1688-1744)," in(Detroit: Gale Research, 1982), pp.

Essay on Criticism - Summery | Alexander Pope | Horace

Hear how learn'd Greece her useful Rules indites,

When to repress, and when indulge our Flights:

High on Parnassus' Top her Sons she show'd,

And pointed out those arduous Paths they trod,

Held from afar, aloft, th' Immortal Prize,

And urg'd the rest by equal Steps to rise;

Just Precepts thus from great Examples giv'n,

She drew from them what they deriv'd from Heav'n

The gen'rous Critick fann'd the Poet's Fire,

And taught the World, with Reason to Admire.

Then Criticism the Muse's Handmaid prov'd,

To dress her Charms, and make her more belov'd;

But following Wits from that Intention stray'd;

Who cou'd not win the Mistress, woo'd the Maid;

Against the Poets their own Arms they turn'd,

Sure to hate most the Men from whom they learn'd

So modern Pothecaries, taught the Art

By Doctor's Bills to play the Doctor's Part,

Bold in the Practice of mistaken Rules,

Prescribe, apply, and call their Masters Fools.

Some on the Leaves of ancient Authors prey,

Nor Time nor Moths e'er spoil'd so much as they:

Some dryly plain, without Invention's Aid,

Write dull Receits how Poems may be made:

These leave the Sense, their Learning to display,

And theme explain the Meaning quite away

Includes Cleanth Brooks's classicnew-critical reading of  and EmrysJones's influential essay on .

Stevenson detailed his three cruises and adventures in the letters he wrote to his friends, exulting in his newfound health, relating incidents of life on the open sea, and capturing the flavor of life lived away from Western civilization. From 1889 to 1894 his attitude toward the islanders in his letters gradually changed from paternalism to sympathy for their troubles with Western imperialism. He studied South Seas politics to espouse plans that he believed would ensure harmony between the whites and the indigenous races of the South Pacific. The naiveté of his early letters is absent from his remarkable book of essays on the various island groups and their peoples--. Written from material he had collected on the three cruises, the book reveals a much shrewder observer of human nature and politics than the man who had written . He viewed the islanders as humans who were not without a valid culture of their own. They were not all cannibals, nor were they all noble savages. As for politics, he advocated self-rule for the islands, a view that did not always make him popular with contemporary travelers and settlers in the Pacific. But he was never predictable. While he was in Hawaii, for example, Stevenson felt himself drawn to the royalists--those who wanted the United States out of Hawaii. But he resisted becoming involved in their intrigues because he did not fully trust the royalists themselves.

Includes essays onpolitics, religion, visual arts, economics, classicism, andcriticism.


Essay on criticism horace - Smart Apartments Ibiza

Horace still charms with graceful negligence,
And without method talks us into sense;
Will like a friend familiarly convey
The truest notions in the easiest way.
He who supreme in judgment as in wit,
Might boldly censure, as he boldly writ,
Yet judged with coolness though he sung with fire;
His precepts teach but what his works inspire
Our critics take a contrary extreme
They judge with fury, but they write with phlegm:
Nor suffers Horace more in wrong translations
By wits than critics in as wrong quotations.

An Essay on Criticism - Wikipedia

But soon by Impious Arms from Latium chas'd,

Their ancient Bounds the banish'd Muses past:

Thence Arts o'er all the Northern World advance,

But Critic Learning flourish'd most in France.

The Rules, a Nation born to serve, obeys,

And Boileau still in Right of Horace sways.

But we, brave Britons, Foreign Laws despis'd,

And kept unconquer'd and unciviliz'd,

Fierce for the Liberties of Wit, and bold,

We still defy'd the Romans as of old.

Yet some there were, among the sounder Few

Of those who less presum'd, and better knew,

Who durst assert the juster Ancient Cause,

And here restor'd Wit's Fundamental Laws.

Such was the Muse, whose Rules and Practice tell,

Nature's chief Master-piece is writing well.

Such was Roscomon--not more learn'd than good,

With Manners gen'rous as his Noble Blood;

To him the Wit of Greece and Rome was known,

And ev'ry Author's Merit, but his own.

Such late was Walsh,--the Muse's Judge and Friend,

Who justly knew to blame or to commend;

To Failings mild, but zealous for Desert;

The clearest Head, and the sincerest Heart.

This humble Praise, lamented Shade! receive,

This Praise at least a grateful Muse may give!

The Muse, whose early Voice you taught to Sing,

Prescrib'd her Heights, and prun'd her tender Wing,

(Her Guide now lost) no more attempts to rise,

But in low Numbers short Excursions tries:

Content, if hence th' Unlearned their Wants may view,

The Learn'd reflect on what before they knew:

Careless of Censure, not too fond of Fame,

Still pleas'd to praise, yet not afraid to blame,

Averse alike to Flatter, or Offend,

Not free from Faults, nor yet too vain to mend.

An Essay on Criticism - Wikiquote

But if in Noble Minds some Dregs remain,
Not yet purg'd off, of Spleen and sow'r Disdain,
Discharge that Rage on more Provoking Crimes,
Nor fear a Dearth in these Flagitious Times.
No Pardon vile Obscenity should find,
Tho' Wit and Art conspire to move your Mind;
But Dulness with Obscenity must prove
As Shameful sure as Importance in Love.
In the fat Age of Pleasure, Wealth, and Ease,
Sprung the rank Weed, and thriv'd with large Increase;
When Love was all an easie Monarch's Care;
Seldom at Council, never in a War:
Jilts rul'd the State, and Statesmen Farces writ;
Nay Wits had Pensions, and young Lords had Wit:
The Fair sate panting at a Courtier's Play,
And not a Mask went un-improv'd away:
The modest Fan was liked up no more,
And Virgins smil'd at what they blush'd before —
The following Licence of a Foreign Reign
Did all the Dregs of bold Socinus drain;
Then Unbelieving Priests reform'd the Nation,
And taught more Pleasant Methods of Salvation;
Where Heav'ns Free Subjects might their Rights dispute,
Lest God himself shou'd seem too Absolute.
Pulpits their Sacred Satire learn'd to spare,
And Vice admir'd to find a Flatt'rer there!
Encourag'd thus, Witt's Titans brav'd the Skies,
And the Press groan'd with Licenc'd Blasphemies
These Monsters, Criticks! with your Darts engage,
Here point your Thunder, and exhaust your Rage!
Yet shun their Fault, who, Scandalously nice,
Will needs mistake an Author into Vice;
All seems Infected that th' Infected spy,
As all looks yellow to the Jaundic'd Eye.