All My Sons Essay Questions | GradeSaver

Joe Keller, the tragic hero of Arthur Miller's play All My Sons, was no different.

All My Sons: Essay Q&A | Novelguide

It turned out, then, that summer, that the moral barriers that I had supposed to exist between me and the dangers of a criminal career were so tenuous as to be nearly nonexistent. I certainly could not discover any principled reason for not becoming a criminal, and it is not my poor, God-fearing parents who are to be indicted for the lack but this society. I was icily determined—more determined, really, than I then knew—never to make my peace with the ghetto but to die and go to Hell before I would let any white man spit on me, before I would accept my “place” in this republic. I did not intend to allow the white people of this country to tell me who I was, and limit me that way, and polish me off that way. And yet, of course, at the same time, I was being spat on and defined and described and limited, and could have been polished off with no effort whatever. Every Negro boy—in my situation during those years, at least—who reaches this point realizes, at once, profoundly, because he wants to live, that he stands in great peril and must find, with speed, a “thing,” a gimmick, to lift him out, to start him on his way. And it does not matter what the gimmick is. It was this last realization that terrified me and—since it revealed that the door opened on so many dangers—helped to hurl me into the church. And, by an unforeseeable paradox, it was my career in the church that turned out, precisely, to be my gimmick.

All My Sons owes much of its format to the tragedies of ancient Greece and the work of the Norwegian playwright, Henrik Ibsen.

Category: All My Sons Essays; Title: All My Sons

In ‘All My Sons’ the classic, comfortable American suburban family is chosen as the matrix through which to explore the great dilemma between personal greed, in this case for the benefit of the family and public responsibility. The family recurs throughout Miller’s canon as the conduit through which great moral issues are flushed. The Loman family in ‘Death of a Salesman’ (1949) is another example.

In the play “All My Sons,” by Arthur Miller, the word ‘father’ means the personification of goodness and infallibility to Chris Keller.

For when I tried to assess my capabilities, I realized that I had almost none. In order to achieve the life I wanted, I had been dealt, it seemed to me, the worst possible hand. I could not become a prizefighter—many of us tried but very few succeeded. I could not sing. I could not dance. I had been well conditioned by the world in which I grew up, so I did not yet dare take the idea of becoming a writer seriously. The only other possibility seemed to involve my becoming one of the sordid people on the Avenue, who were not really as sordid as I then imagined but who frightened me terribly, both because I did not want to live that life and because of what they made me feel. Everything inflamed me, and that was bad enough, but I myself had also become a source of fire and temptation. I had been far too well raised, alas, to suppose that any of the extremely explicit overtures made to me that summer, sometimes by boys and girls but also, more alarmingly, by older men and women, had anything to do with my attractiveness. On the contrary, since the Harlem idea of seduction is, to put it mildly, blunt, whatever these people saw in me merely confirmed my sense of my depravity.

But I think to him they were all my sons.” After realizing the damage he has caused Joe cannot deal with his tremendous guilt.