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Dirty Pretty Things (2002) Video Essay - YouTube

I appreciated your article and wholeheartedly agree. Here is where I struggle and why I intentionally point out ALL traits I see in the young girls (and young boys) I work with as a school counselor…no one, not even my parents, said that I was pretty. My mother always said “pretty is as pretty does” and then she never complimented me…so I felt I never did anything right either. I didn’t feel exceptionally smart or talented, just good at doing the laundry. Now as an adult woman I struggle with self esteem, facial and body image. I truly believe if just one significant person in my life had told me I was beautiful I wouldn’t seek it in unhealthy ways. I tell students they are dressed nicely for school, I get excited when I hear them reading, I point out how glad I am to see them because they make me smile and I do all of this to fat, skinny, homely, beautiful, intelligent, special ed and struggling students. I believe EACH child is beautiful and they need to know it… not the beauty that the world holds but the beauty that they each hold. We can always find ONE good thing about a kid and make sure to tell them out loud, so others hear it! I also believe modeling appropriate work attire, coming to work with my hair done and ready to hit the ground running are good examples to students. There are days I wear no makeup and no jewelry…kids see me as less put together these days. I just tell them that I wanted to look more simple today but I’m still here to work for them…they accept that. The messages that we give children are so powerful and we are powerful force for good when we empower them to see the beauty inside of themselves and not look for approval from the world. I wish someone had done that for me!

Nov 23, 2015 · Pretty Dirty Things (2002) directed by Stephen Frears

Dirty Pretty Things (2003) Synopsis - Plot Summary - Fandango

All hail SMART! I remember being so fixated on appearance in high-school that it was painful. Here are the points that I should have realized then:
1) Pretty wasn’t going to get me into university. I am now working on my Ph.D. in biology.
2) Pretty wasn’t going to get me the grades I needed to maintain.
3) Pretty wasn’t going to get me a job in my field of interest.
4) Pretty wasn’t going to get my papers published. No scientist sends mug shots in with their research write-ups.
5) Pretty did not lead to me meeting my husband. He thinks the whole package is beautiful, but he always says that he has never been interested in someone who lacks intelligence.
For as smart as I was in high-school, appearance was the one place where I woefully idiotic. I was too obsessed with thinking that I wasn’t pretty enough. I also had a constant stream of people telling me how pretty my younger sister was. It took me awhile to mentally overcome that conditioning.
Be smart. Beauty – true beauty – comes from passion in your life and interests. Intelligence will give you that passion.

Read Dirty Pretty Things (2003) synopsis, storyline and movie plot summary on Fandango.

Thank you for this fresh perspective and an important message. I did not grow up with pink or barbie dolls and I do not expose my daughter to these things intentionally, but of course it’s there. My daughter enjoys dressing up and I cannot help gushing when she puts on a pretty outfit regardless of how well coordinated it looks. Sometimes she is breath-taking and sometimes she combines several patterns at once. But I do celebrate her enthusiasm for looking pretty as much as I celebrate her wonderful drawings, kicking of a soccer ball, or climbing up a tree dirtying her new dress (yay thrift stores). It is important to emphasize brains, creativity, athleticism, social responsibility, but also feeling beautiful on the inside and out. Thank you again for a great story!

Movie Review- Dirty Pretty Things | Written Essays


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First, I am totally there with you on the general slant of your topic, and bravo for the beautiful point by point story. I also strive to go with acknowledgement of who someone is (children and adults) rather than looks. And I get how hard that is sometimes! however, I wanted to remark on the above line: what about–A life of meaning, a life of ideas, presence, and being valued. Period. Not for anything, simply because we are? for our unique gifts we give to the world, no matter what they are–reading books is just one thing, valuable (I’m one of them, trust me–and this culture has really rewarded me for such things).

Dirty Pretty Things Movie Review 2003 Roger Ebert

LisaBloom! hey!I just read—” Here’s to changing the world, one little girl at a time.” n tht of sharing dis one–
my niece born n brought up in US visited india i toook her evrywhere for sightseeing n shoppping along with my sis in law. she would jump seeing pink n insist dat she wanted it…let dat be just pencil / eraser/band… i was taken back!! while we were still on the outings spree i took her to cross roads n shoppers stop n asked her to buy anything in my account as gift for her ( for free) she got excited but….i added it has to be either skyblue…or garden green !! she looked @ me sharply n lost excitement .. but i told her she has to choose her gifts on her own n it could be anything in those colours / any toys except barbie MY !!! she was mad… but had no option . but i remeber well! during her next trip she nade it a point to wear those blue n green dressses n books to read!!!!! i was damn happy i could change her perspective …

Dirty Pretty Things Film Notes - HOME

The common trend is for women to be beautiful and to care for the house, and the men to be idiots who cannot measure up to the woman at home (or at work, depending on your choice). These are reinforced not just through media, but by peer pressure as well. We encourage girls to be what they want, to strive to be smart, to be the best, to be wonderful at EVERYTHING, and to top it off you have to be pretty too because no matter how successful you are it means nothing if you aren’t beautiful. Her male peers will reinforce it at an early age by picking on her appearance, and her female peers will follow suit. The adults will try to tell her she is beautiful instead of telling her life means more than looks, and they’ll reinforce that through the media they watch, and the actions they take day to day. When the parent focuses on clothes, and makeup, and appearance it reinforces that pressure. When we talk about how pretty some other adult looks, or who we find to be pretty in movies and TV shows, it reinforces the behaviors. When we criticize others based on appearance alone in the presence of the child, it AGAIN reinforces that behavior. These criticisms and ideas are societal placed, and reinforced day to day. But it’s not exclusive to girls.