Analysis of "But What Do You Mean?" Essay - 654 Words

Following are some examples of colloquial language taken from student essays:

But What Do You Mean - North Seattle College

Becoming a scientist in future I want to develop a systematic approach for creating awareness about the phenomenon that observation, tests, and falsifiable experiments are necessary to understand how nature works. For example, scientists, through observations and experiments, are able to know about DNA codes and involve in stem cell research for the purpose of cure and support medical treatment of incurable diseases. As science challenges current and existing ideas discovered in the past which is not directly testable or observable, therefore, interpreting and challenging past ideas pose huge challenge to reject previous ideas and discover new things. Scientific theories enable us to engage continuously in the process of discovering.

The reason I noticed the problem is that your other points are so lucid and elegant.” Men don't sugarcoat what they really mean.

But What Do You Mean? Essay Examples - New York essay

An essay should not be merely a list. Too many in the past have been a list of notes, or a series of sub-headings followed by a list of dashes (-) or stars (*) accompanied by one or two words and/or quotations from the literary text with no explanation of what they are doing there. Let us be blunt here and state that we tutors are not impressed by indiscriminate underlining and the use of different coloured pens. Sub-headings written in magenta, underlined in ochre, followed by a list of quotations in vermilion are pointless. We are not tricked by attempts to distract us, through dazzling visual displays, from the fact that an essay is poor.

She gives examples about the main areas of miscommunications such as apologies, criticism, thank-yous, fighting, praise, complaints, and jokes.

Unnecessary words confuse and frustrate the reader (marker). Using too many words is a common fault in student writing. Most students do battle with the word count (allowable words per essay), so when you’re editing your writing be aware of the tendency to overuse words. You can cut out unnecessary words—without changing the meaning—to reduce your word count. The following table shows you a few common wordy phrases and their shorter replacements:

What is Tannen’s purpose in writing this essay


How Word Choice and Language Sets the Tone of Your Essay

A good essay takes time to prepare and write, so start to think about it and do the groundwork well ahead of the essay deadline (even in timed conditions, such as exams, it is important to take the time to organise and structure the essay before starting to write). You will probably find that you need to work out your ideas on paper before writing the essay, and are encouraged to prepare an outline of the essay: a point by point series of key words, phrases and ideas. This will help you to organise the structure and to recognise what is relevant and irrelevant to the essay as a whole. Some people find that a plan or outline will consist of eight to ten words only. Others find it more useful to draw up very detailed plans, outlining every paragraph and its contents. Again you will discover which method works for you as you go along. Some students find it easier to think and plan the essay point by point before beginning to write, whilst others find that after some initial preparation, reading, organisation and thinking they can only develop their ideas through writing. Both these approaches take time, if the essays are to be done well. It should be stressed here that the first plan does not have to be binding and may change as the work begins and develops. The main point here is that essays involve a certain amount of planning and preparation even before the actual writing begins. Having emphasised that essays are hard work and take time it should also be stressed that it can be very stimulating and rewarding to work through a number of ideas in depth and detail. Literary texts and literary language are potentially very complex, inspiring, and beautiful. The ideas and images often demand careful thought and attention.

“But What Do You Mean?” Rhetorical Analysis Essay …

The final event of the essay pulls together both the sameness of the experience and the foreboding. In the development and aftermath of a thunderstorm at the lake, there are the same sounds and patterns, the same reactions. But it was also like "the revival of an old melodrama," with its "premonitory rumble," then "crackling light against the dark, and the gods grinning and licking their chops in the hills." As the storm ends, the campers run out "in joy and relief" to swim in the rain, "perpetuating the deathless joke" about getting drenched as they swim, "linking the generations in a strong indestructible chain."

What do you mean by Compensation Structure? Essay


After you read paragraphs 2 and 3, go back and look at the —you should see that the notes gave me the information I need, and all I have to do here is turn it into reasonably smooth sentences. This is a good example of how the writing process works: I can gather ideas and evidence first, without worrying about sentences; then I can build decent sentences without worrying about the ideas or evidence.